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Monday, January 21, 2019

Antiques Show & Vintage Market this weekend will showcase objects with stories to tell - Grand Island Independent

KEARNEY — Jason Combs calls his love of antiques a “genetic disorder.”

When he was growing up in Fairfax, Mo., his grandparents and parents took him to flea markets in places like Brownsville, Neb., and White Cloud, Kan., and antiques soaked into his soul.

“I like the stories antiques tell. I’m curious about what they have to say,” Combs said.

This weekend, he and Sherry Morrow will co-produce the Antiques Show & Vintage Market from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Ramada Inn at 301 Second Ave. The 28 vendors from Nebraska, South Dakota, Kansas and Iowa will sell glassware, jewelry, toys, vintage clothing and more.

“Once people buy from a vendor, they come back to that vendor. Vendors often buy their wares with a specific customer in mind,” Morrow said. “We don’t want a whole room with the same type of stuff. The better the items we have, the more people we draw, especially if known vendors are going to be there.”

Combs owns Burr Oak Antiques and Appraisals here in Kearney. He appraises antiques on NTV’s “The Good Life” once a month. He said being at an antique show is “like being at a mobile coffee shop.”

“A year ago at a show in Atkinson, a man brought in a gypsy’s musical box that played music. It had straps and a crank and a big metal disc. When you opened it up, it was a little theater. It was one of the craziest things I’ve ever seen. This man’s family were gypsies from Europe. That’s where he got this thing,” Combs said.

Another man brought him a pair of Buffalo Bill’s Remington pistols in a walnut case, with ivory grips carved especially for Buffalo Bill. “Remington had given Buffalo Bill that set, but I couldn’t appraise it because there were no others like it. I couldn’t be sure what something like that would bring in,” Combs said.

Morrow and Combs are producing the show for the third year. They do two shows each year, one the second weekend in November and one the last weekend in January. Combs said those weekends are “the bookends” at either side of the antique show season. “Before Christmas, people are looking for gifts. After Christmas, they’re getting rid of gifts,” Morrow said.

Combs, who also is a geography professor at the University of Nebraska at Kearney, loves sharing his avocation. In spring 2014, he wrote an article for Great Plains Research, “Junk Jaunt Geography: Buying and Selling America’s Cultural Past in Central Nebraska.” The Junk Jaunt is the 15-year-old, 300-mile late September garage sale stretching from Grand Island west to Halsey and back. “I noticed that for some people, the Junk Jaunt is just the thrill of the hunt. People get an ice cream cone and take off for the day,” he said. Other shoppers search seriously for quality antiques.

Morrow, a Buffalo County commissioner and assistant professor of industrial technology at the University of Nebraska at Kearney, has a fascination for relics, too. She has a personal collection of items bearing logos of Kearney County, Buffalo County or Brown County. She has a fondness for Richardson Root Beer items, too, because her parents owned a drive-in in Atkinson, and her sister married a man from the Richardson family.

The show used to be held at the Buffalo County Fairgrounds, but Morrow and Combs moved it to the Ramada Inn because “people like the comfort of being inside,” Morrow said. She said the lighting and presentation are excellent and the floor is carpeted. A $5 admission per person covers both days.

“We just like to have people come and look around,” she said. “As for me, I enjoy browsing and saying, ‘Oh, I remember that!” or ‘I had one of those!’”

maryjane.skala@kearneyhub.com



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What’s Happening for Jan. 21 - The Olympian

Monday

MLK Day of Service projects

  • Lacey: Volunteer with the Stream Team from 10 a.m. to noon to remove invasive plants and plant native vegetation to help restore Woodland Creek Community Park’s riparian buffer and natural areas. You can sign up for tree planting, weeding/mulching, or removing ivy or blackberries. Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes. Tools and snacks provided. Woodland Creek is at 6729 Pacific Ave. SE, Lacey. Stream Team needs 55 volunteers. Information: Emily Watts at ewatts@ci.lacey.wa.us or 360-486-8707.
  • Littlerock: The Center for Natural Lands Management will lead a work party at the Glacial Heritage Preserve, 4 miles south of Littlerock, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tasks include building bonfires of downed fir trees and pulling invasive scotch broom. Carpool offered from downtown Olympia. Information: ssvolunteers@cnlm.org.
  • Capitol Land Trust: Capitol Land Trust will restore an area at Harmony Farm Preserve so it can become an outdoor classroom. Monday’s work party from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. will remove invasive species, stage logs for seating and create a habitat pile. Spots are limited for this event. Tools, gloves and light snacks will be provided. Dress for the weather; the work will be done rain or shine. Sturdy shoes are recommended. Minors must be accompanied by an adult or have a waiver filled out ahead of time. Information: jill@capitollandtrust.org.
  • Nisqually Land Trust: The land trust will host a work party from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to begin to restore a newly acquired parcel in the Powell Creek Protected Area. Volunteers will plant native tree and shrub species to improve habitat for fish and wildlife, including threatened Chinook salmon. Come for the whole day, or drop in for the morning or afternoon. Coffee and light snacks provided. Register for directions to the site at americorps@nisquallylandtrust.org.

Tuesday

March for Life rally: Thousands will gather from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on the west side of the Capitol Campus to oppose abortion. The event will affect traffic and parking on the west Capitol Campus. The north and south diagonals, which have a 100 visitor parking stalls, will be reserved for buses dropping off and picking up event attendees. March for Life participants will begin gathering about 11 a.m. near the Winged Victory Monument then march to the north steps of the Legislative Building about noon to hear speakers.

Thursday

History Talks at Schmidt House: “The Art of Oral History” will be the topic of the noon talk by John Hughes, the chief historian for the Office of the Secretary of State. Hughes will highlight his use of oral histories throughout his 42-year journalism career and document extraordinary stories in Washington history. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. and close at capacity at the Schmidt House, 330 Schmidt Place SW, Tumwater. Free, but donations to the Olympia Tumwater Foundation are welcome. Information: olytumfoundation.org.

Special Olympics of Thurston County basketball tournament: Watch more than 100 Special Olympics basketball athletes play starting at 7 p.m. at Capital High School, 2707 Conger Ave. NW, Olympia. A cheer squad, drill squad, and a band will attend, along with announcers and referees. A $5 donation for admission will stay with the Thurston County Special Olympics programs supporting more than 400 athletes. Information: bballdad11@comcast.net.

Allyn Diabetes Support Group: The group will host an open discussion entitled “Diabetes: What’s On Your Mind?” from 1-2 p.m. in the meeting room at the Port of Allyn building, 18560 state Route 3. Diabetes educator Debbie McGinnis will start with an overview of diabetes, followed by an open discussion on diabetes self-management. Loved ones are invited to attend. The support group meets every fourth Thursday of the month from September to June. Free. Information: 360-427-7332.

Friday

Fungi Perfecti Oyster Mushroom Workshop: Fungi Perfecti is hosting an oyster mushroom growing workshop from 5:30-7 p.m. at GRuB, 2016 Elliot Ave. NW, Olympia. Participants need to register by Jan. 22, and bring one 2 to 5 gallon bucket. RSVP to Laura@goodgrub.org, Beau@goodgrub.org or 360-753-5522.

Friday and Saturday

Olympia LGBTQ Meditation group: The group is sponsoring Tuere Sala, a Buddhist teacher from the Seattle Insight Meditation Society, for two events: from 7-9 p.m. Friday and from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, both at the Olympia Friends’ Meeting House, 3201 Boston Harbor Road NE, Olympia. Suggested event donation is $5-$20 plus teacher offering for Friday, and $10-$30 plus offering for Saturday. There is no registration, just pay at the door. Saturday attendees should bring a lunch.

Saturday

Sea Level Rise and King Tides: City of Olympia staff will be available from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the Harbor House on Percival Landing to answer questions about King Tides and the City of Olympia, Port of Olympia and LOTT Clean Water Alliance’s joint sea level rise response planning effort. The predicted time of the King Tide is 9:50 a.m. Information: olympiawa.gov/slr

Karen Fraser Woodland Trail work party: Prepare to get dirty from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. when volunteers will plant native vegetation to restore the forested habitat so wildlife can thrive. The trail entrance is at 1600 Eastside St. SE. Meet near the restrooms. The work party will walk a ways down the trail to the work site, so be on time. Limited parking is available.

Amphibians of the Pacific Northwest workshop: Join Stream Team and herpetological ecologist Marc Hayes to learn about the unique characteristics of native amphibians species. This free workshop will run 9:30 to 11 a.m. at the LOTT WET Science Center, 500 Adams St. NE, Olympia. For information or to register, go to streamteam.info.

Annual meeting of Olympia Historical Society and Bigelow House Museum: The program is entitled “Reel Olympia,” and will feature a narrated montage of historic video clips from early to mid-century Olympia. It will run 1-3 p.m. at the Capitol Theater, 206 Fifth Ave. SE, Olympia. It is open to the public. The historical society also will recognition D.G. Parrott & Son and the Olympia Yacht Club for being in business more than 100 years. And board position nominations will be accepted and voted upon by the membership. Information: olyhistory@gmail.com.

Giant Annual Rummage Sale: The Lincoln Elementary School Gym, 213 21st Ave SE, Olympia, is the site of a benefit rummage sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Items include art, jewelry, collectibles, books, music, kitchen and household items, linens and clothing, vintage clothing, bikes, skateboards, games, toys, electronics, sporting and camping goods, garden tools, and wood furniture. The sale benefits Thurston County’s sister community in Nicaragua, Santo Tomas. Contact tstsca@gmail.com for more information, including how to volunteer.

Sunday

Olympia Jazz Tentette to perform: The Olympia Jazz Tentette will perform at 3 p.m. at St. John’s Episcopal Church, 114 20th Ave. SE, Olympia, as the third performance in St. John’s Concert Series. The program will feature works by Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk, Charles Mingus, Miles Davis and Horace Silver. Members of the Tentette include Brad Schrandt, alto sax; Aaron Wolff, tenor sax; Kevin Hall, baritone sax; Syd Potter, director and trumpet; Lee Mohler, trumpet; Don Gardner, trombone; Debbie Japp, piano; Cooper Schlegel, bass; Craig Cootsona, drums; and Daven Tillinghast, guitar. A free-will offering will be taken, with suggested donations of $20 general admission, $10 for students and seniors. A reception will follow the performance. Park at 19th and Capitol Way and at the Lord Mansion a block south.



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Levis Brings Back the 90s with Their Engineered Jeans - Complex

Meghan Markle rocks casual jeans-and-heels outfit — see the look - TODAY

Shoppers Are Saying These Skinny Jeans Feel Like Leggings - Us Weekly

Tommy Hilfiger to Introduce Sustainable Denim Jeans - WWD

For pre-fall, Vivetta Ponti reimagined the characters of an antique tapestry through a punkish filter. The result was a collection that looked a tad less sugar-coated compared to previous seasons. While the brand’s signature feminine ad whimsical iconography, including cute animals and butterflies, were still there, a range of tartan pieces, including a coat and a plissé skirt showing floral inserts, as well as maxi-printed puffers, exuded a cool, urban vibe, writes @aleturra85. #wwdfashion #vivetta #prefall2019



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Your Favorite Men's Jeans & T-Shirt Combo Is On Sale At Madewell Today - Forbes

Begin the New Year by going back to the basics. As we head into MLK weekend, the first major sales period of the year, consumers are looking to buy clothes that will enable them to look their best in 2019. Rank and Style, a fashion and beauty analytics company that creates unbiased, data-driven top ten lists, found that this January, shoppers are spending more on wardrobe essentials than they were over the holiday season.

In September 2018, Madewell finally launched menswear. With a focus on jeans and tee shirts, J. Crew’s sister brand offers men high-quality essentials to help them look their best all year round. This MLK Day weekend, select menswear styles from the retailer are 40% off when you use the code “DOUBLEYAY” at checkout.

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Read on to discover some beautiful men’s basics at bargain prices.

Skinny Jeans in Vintage Light: Ripped EditionMadewell

Skinny Jeans in Vintage Light: Ripped Edition ($100) 

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Skinny Jeans in Brooklyn Wash: Ripped EditionMadewell

Skinny Jeans in Brooklyn Wash: Ripped Edition ($100) 

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Slim Jeans in Santell WashMadewell

Slim Jeans in Santell Wash ($100) 

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From light wash to dark wash, ripped to clean-legged, these skinny jeans are staples for any man’s casual wardrobe. Pair these items with a tee shirt or a hoodie and sneakers for an effortless, put-together outfit. To elevate your everyday look, wear these jeans with a polo or button-down shirt and Chelsea boots.

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Garment-Dyed Daily Crewneck Pocket TeeMadewell

Garment-Dyed Daily Crewneck Pocket Tee ($30) 

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Garment-Dyed Daily Crewneck TeeMadewell

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Garment-Dyed Daily Crewneck Tee ($30) 

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Every man needs a few solid-colored, crisp tee shirts in his closet. In the colder months, layer these garments under a sweater or blazer. For the warmer season ahead, these shirts work well on their own, paired with a well-fitting pair of jeans. Make sure to stock up on these crew neck and pocket tees this weekend before they’re gone.



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Antiques Show & Vintage Market this weekend will showcase objects with stories to tell - Grand Island Independent

KEARNEY — Jason Combs calls his love of antiques a “genetic disorder.” When he was growing up in Fairfax, Mo., his grandparents and parent...